Is Greek Yogurt Paleo?

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Greek yogurt is loaded with protein and it is a low-sugar alternative to other dairy products. This healthy food is also high in calcium, and only contains 100 calories per 170 gram container. One of the best benefits of Greek yogurt is it helps to promote digestive health by supplying your body with probiotics.

There is no question that this is a healthy food, but is Greek yougurt paleo food? Unfortunately no.

Greek yogurt is not paleo. Why? Yogurt isn’t something that our distant ancestors ate. You can’t forage or hunt for it. It does not fit the essential criteria of the paleo diet. Also, yogurt is a dairy product which is one of the food groups that’s not Paleo approved.

Why Greek Yogurt Is Not Paleo?

The Paleo diet consists of the foods that were available to humans before agriculture, animal domestication, and domestic cooking methods were developed. Sticking with these natural, unprocessed, and pure foods is a way to align your diet with the nutritional needs of our ancestors, the foods that humans are well adapted to consume.

Anything that you could go out and find in the wild, or that you could hunt, is pure Paleo. Think nuts, seeds, fresh fruits and veggies, meat, fish, and eggs.

Greek yogurt, like all dairy products, is not paleo. No one was eating yogurt, cheese, or milk during the Paleolithic period as no one was raising cows or goats and producing milk.

Greek Yogurt is also Processed

Another essential reason that Greek yogurt can not be included in a pure paleo diet, is that it is processed. Live active cultures are added to cow’s milk to create the creamy consistency and sour taste of yogurt.

Then, the yogurt is strained to remove lactose and whey. Greek yogurt is more heavily strained than regular yogurt, which is why it is thicker, higher in protein, and tends to be lower in sugar as it requires fewer fillers than your average cup of yogurt.

Whether it is plain yogurt or Greek yogurt, they are both not part of the Paleo diet.

Yogurt Alternatives

If you do leave yogurt out of your diet, as well as all other dairy products, how is it possible to include enough calcium in your diet? Can you get enough of this mineral from nuts, seeds, and veggies?

While Greek yogurt is an excellent source of calcium, there are other foods that you can eat to make sure you are getting enough. Green leafy vegetables, broccoli, and carrots all contain some calcium. Nuts are another good source, especially almonds. You can also get calcium from sesame seeds.

It is important to eat plenty of these foods to make sure you are getting enough calcium. This mineral is important for bone health, but also for the well-being of your nervous system and your heart. Eating a green salad every day topped with nuts or seeds and drizzled with lemon juice and a nut oil is a great way to boost your calcium intake while staying true to the paleo diet.

To learn more about some of the foods you can include in your Paleo shopping list check this article out.

Conclusion

Is Greek yogurt paleo? No, it is not, but it is definitely a healthy food. You can follow a strict paleo diet and include plenty of high-calcium alternatives in your diet.

On the other hand, you can also choose to live a more flexible paleo lifestyle and eat healthy, minimally-processed foods like yogurt. Some paleo followers do this allocating a part of their meal plans to foods that are healthy and they like to eat but not paleo. All this depends on your goals and why you are going Paleo. If you do choose to add Greek yogurt to your diet, try to choose the plain version without the extra flavorings and one that doesn’t contain fillers like sugar and salt.

For more foods and Paleo friendly recipes, you can check out the 1000 Paleo Recipes Collection, or the Paleo Leap Recipe Book below.

Some of our favorite Paleo recipes and resources:

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